Thursday, December 14, 2006

The Continental Divide--Montana Style

This photo was taken by HWDDD when he was elk hunting near Lima, Montana. The elevation at this point is approximately 8,500 feet. I could post pictures of the elk he shot, but I would probably get a lot of Bambi killer comments and I'm not up for that right now.

In other news, I took my 83 year old dad to get his driver's license renewed today. He didn't pass the eye test because he has macular degeneration. Even though he hasn't driven in several years, it upset him. I imagine that he feels he is losing his independence, bit by bit. I wish I could make it better for him. I wish I could help him and my brother more. I wish, I wish...

18 comments:

Cathy said...

Oh, I am so sorry about your dad's vision. I take women with macular degeneration to a monthly meeting and I've listened as they recounted the devastation of losing their vision.

Aging is so danged tough. I can imagine your concern for your dad.

It's interesting - I fully support hunting. Hunting is in our genes and made it possible for generations of families to survive. It's also good to manage the wild population for its health. Still, I'm always a little saddened by pictures of these beautiful creatures lying still in the snow or draped across a truck. So, thanks, dear, for sparing my sensibilities :0)

dmmgmfm said...

Aging is tough, but as my dad always says, "it's better than the alternative". He's got a great sense of humor on the days when his Parkinson's isn't kicking his butt and even when he's having a bad day, he's a sweetie.

About hunting...I'm not a big fan, though I know it's necessary. I'd rather hunt with my camera.

Anvilcloud said...

I know these kinds of things can be traumatic for the old ones. Fortunately, he has an understanding and sympathetic daughter to support him.

dmmgmfm said...

AC: My brother is the daily caretaker. He lives with my dad, but works 14 miles away. His shifts are 12 hours and they alternate between days and nights so when dad is having trouble I come home and stay with them. Thank god I can telecommute.

K said...

Your dad is lucky to have you both as close supports.

That picture is gorgeous. Nothing like that here.

KC

K said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Rosa said...

Truly beautiful! And a great place for wind turbines!

threecollie said...

Very beautiful picture. Congrats to hwddd on it and the elk.
Sorry about your dad....

dmmgmfm said...

KC: I have several more that I will post later. Montana really is a gorgeous state.

Update on dad: He is feeling better! Today he even took a walk and shoveled snow off of the deck! I am so happy!

LauraHinNJ said...

Beautiful photo - I haven't seen mountains like that (yet!)

Driving isn't everything, and as a daughter I'd be glad that the state said my dad couldn't drive, rather than me having to suggest that he not drive.

My dad has passed away, but he drove for years despite his cataracts and worried me so! At least he had the sense not to drive at night and to only go locally.

Sometimes Saintly Nick said...

I understand you dad’s reaction. Although I am 23 years younger than he, I still experience sadness when I feel I can no longer do something I once did—such as run and climb. My blessings to him.

The last time I crossed the Continental Divide, I was in Arizona (or was it New Mexico?). The scenery was much different.

dmmgmfm said...

Rosa: It is beautiful and very hard to get to in the winter. But wind turbines are going in all over Montana now, so that is a very good thing.

Threecollie: HWDDD is quite proud of himself. I was teasing him earlier that I would be more impressed if the elk had been armed. ;)

Laura: I have to agree that I would rather he not drive. In fact he hadn't driven in about 3 years, so I guess his sadness had more to do with it not being his own choice now. So sorry to hear of your dad's passing.

Nick: Thanks so much for your kind comment. My dad is aging quite gracefully, as I am sure you will when that time comes. The thing that impresses me most about my dad is his positive outlook and determination. This morning he announced that he needed to "get back into shape" and took a walk (for the first time in months).

Sometimes Saintly Nick said...

I'm glad to hear all of that about your dad. That he decided to "get in shape" and started with that walk says a lot about his spirit, especially after receiving such a disappointment regarding his license.

dmmgmfm said...

Nick: Thanks for the nice comment. I'm pretty excited about the recent developments. I talked to him on the phone a couple of hours ago and he sounded wonderful. I thank god for every good moment he has.

Katherine said...

That's a really beautiful picture! I'm very sorry to hear about you dad. That day is coming for mine, too, and I'm dreading it.

dmmgmfm said...

Katherine: It is hard on everyone, but most especially on dad. It seems like he has decided to do something about it though. He's determined not to mope around the house anymore and has started walking! I hope he is able to do so without falling, because that would be another blow to his self-esteem, plus it could hurt him. I am optimistic, always, and choose to believe he will be fine. Thanks so much for stopping by my blog.

To all: Thanks so much for the kind words...it means more than you will ever know.

Holiday Hugs,
Laurie

Within Without said...

I join in the thoughts on your dad, who is fortunate to have you and your brother.

Personally, I abhor hunting. It was one thing when all we could hurl at them were spears or arrows.

It's quite another when we're talking about high-powered .303's and shotguns.

And it's yet another when we pen the animals up in an enclosed area, as we do in Canada and elsewhere, and lure American hunters up here to corner them and shoot them.

dmmgmfm said...

Within (may I call you that?): Thanks for the kind thoughts about my dad. I just spoke to him and he was doing quite well. As I have said before, every day that he enjoys life, is a good day.

As for the hunting, I absolutely agree with you. People say it is a necessary evil, that there are too many and they will die of starvation or disease if they aren’t “managed”, but I have to think that humans are the reason that nature is out of whack (if it is). I laugh when hunters call it sport…it would only be sport if the animals were armed. I could go on and on here…as I have been known to do (not making me very popular in this small Montana town), but I won’t since I am probably preaching to the choir.